Interview with Xiaofei Gao

 

The Garden is Gone , 2017   Oil on canvas  120 × 79 in  View on Artsy

The Garden is Gone, 2017

Oil on canvas

120 × 79 in View on Artsy

How does this show differ from other exhibits where you have presented your work?

This is my seventh solo exhibit.  In the past, my exhibits were about recent works as a single series, for example LOVE series. This time, you have chosen to display three different series of works for this exhibit. Because you have chosen to display three series of works, people can see my psychological journey and creative changes in the past ten years.

Gallery view

Gallery view

Holding your hands , 2008   Oil on canvas  22 × 23 1/2 in  View on Artsy

Holding your hands, 2008

Oil on canvas

22 × 23 1/2 in View on Artsy

NIce Blue, 2017  Oil on canvas  37.5× 27.5 View on Artsy

NIce Blue, 2017

Oil on canvas

37.5× 27.5 View on Artsy

 

When did you first started painting ?

The Boy and The Dog , 2008   Oil on canvas  51 1/2 × 40 in  View on Artsy

The Boy and The Dog, 2008

Oil on canvas

51 1/2 × 40 in View on Artsy

I began to learn to paint when I was 30 and entered into the Central Academy of Fine Arts in China that same year. Before I started to paint, I was learning design.  Because I was exposed to painting in my design endeavors, I always knew I would become a painter.  This feeling was very strong in my heart.

What are some of your millstones in your career?

Mother River , 2008  Oil on canvas  26 4/5 × 43 3/10 in  View on Artsy

Mother River, 2008

Oil on canvas

26 4/5 × 43 3/10 in View on Artsy

June of 2004 I completed my studies at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in China and had my first solo exhibition at Peking University- “Color Capture of Peking University”.  After that exhibit concluded, I had my own studio and I became a professional artist.

 

Which pieces in this exhibit do you find most important to your body of work?

The three paintings in this exhibit that touch my heart is number 13. “The garden is Gone”, number 1. “New Landscape”, and number 12. “Wisteria Blossom”.

New Landscape,  Oil on canvas, 71 x96 in (Right)

New Landscape, Oil on canvas, 71 x96 in (Right)

Wisteria Blossom, Oil on Canvas , 2018, 39 x57 in

Wisteria Blossom, Oil on Canvas , 2018, 39 x57 in




Where do you see your art going in the future?            

  I strongly believe in fate and follow my feelings.  At this point, there is no real direction I am going, but I do know that my future will be bright.  I have never worked hard on a subject but I do listen very carefully to my feelings and the sensing of God.

Previous Information on Xiaofei Gao from the Transposition exhibitions

Street Impression III ,  Oil on canvas  39 2/5 × 39 2/5 in  View on Artsy

Street Impression III,

Oil on canvas

39 2/5 × 39 2/5 in View on Artsy

The land and cityscapes of Gao, Xiaofei (b. 1971, Anhui) also demonstrate the evocative brushwork of literati painting, while the impasto oil paint and brooding colors of expressionism convey contemporary experience and a dark, personal mood. In land and cityscapes, dark blacks and browns dominate, capturing the grit and pollution of the city as well as the “melancholy mood of female artists” such as herself. The blurred, broad lines and uneasy angles of buildings imply the dynamism and disruption of rapid urban modernization.


The Honeymoon , Oil on canvas, Private Collection

The Honeymoon, Oil on canvas, Private Collection

While Gao’s landscapes relate to others in the exhibit, she is also known for her distinct figurative works. Gao speaks of a need to express the emotions of female experience which seem to be suggested in these works. Figures are painted without faces, some rounded and stylized like nesting dolls or folk figurines, while others look as if derived from faded photographs. Painted in minimal colors, these scenes suggest memories and time passing. A couple on the beach, a group of children, and a protective family unit of a mother, father, and child dressed in robes evoke the bonds of family and tradition. Lacking distinguishing details, the figures are deliberately generalized to express universal emotions like love and sadness so that, according to the artist, any identity can be projected onto the figures. As in Gao’s landscape paintings, emphasis is placed on the formal choices of color, placement, and brushwork to express the mood and concept.



Learn More About Transposition and the Landmark Arts and Cultural Exchange Company Collection